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#1 Cutter

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:23 PM

Here's a couple tools I've used several times.
The old Q-Tip for pushing out bolts, and the nail
with a hook to remove the main shaft spring.

whaddya got ??

#2 42rocker

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 11:53 PM

Interesting how some of the best things are so simple.

Later 42rocker

#3 DonLans

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 01:32 AM

Here's mine.

#4 bruski

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:57 AM

I would use the nail to clean my ears with.
bruski

#5 Cutter

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:58 PM

Don,
I'm thinking about 30,000 RPM's with your tool.
Did you make it for a specific job ?
Also ,what is your mill ?

#6 Cutter

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:01 PM

Bruski,
Glad your following doctor's advice, no Q-tips

#7 DonLans

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:47 AM

Yes, I made it to grind the heads of the firing pins. I bought hardened ejector pins from Amtek for $3.62 a piece. They are .062" and have a 3/16" OD head. The dremel fixture turns them down real nice. Now, I used it to grind the T-slot cutter for doing the cocking switch. Thanks for the idea of the cutter.

Don
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#8 Cutter

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:02 PM

Thanks Don,
That's real handy, many uses.

#9 Cutter

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 04:18 PM

Hold the Cap in a 1/2" collet and tighten.

#10 DonLans

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 04:32 PM

Very nice. I'll have to make one. Beats vice grips. The machine I have is a Grizzly. I got it and a 19" lathe just to tinker around with after I retired. That was before the Gatling gun project came along. Now, I wish I would have gotten a little bigger and better, but the main thing is, I'm having fun with this project.

#11 Cutter

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 09:15 PM

I got this new box in 1998, first thing was to get rid of Sears name plate.
And make it mine

#12 Cutter

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 03:38 PM

Here's a scale I left in the shear in the 70's, along
with some gold chips from the 60's

#13 DonLans

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 01:47 AM

Is there a story about the scale and the gold?

#14 42rocker

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 04:08 AM

I believe that it was in 1976 that I got my first Craftsman Tool box set. Sears ran a 1/2 off sale. There was a line to get a rain check, took about 20 minutes to get a rain check. I believe that it took about 3 months before it was shipped in and ready for pick up. Of course $100 for a nice 9 drawer top and 4 drawer bottom made the wait worth it.
When I got home and told the new wife what I had just bought I had to explain a few things. Of course I very happy to say that I still have the same wife and tool box.

Later 42rocker

#15 Cutter

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 12:05 AM

Don,
No story, just one of those rookie moves with the scale, but I do use it a few times a year.
I think gold at that time was 30 to 40 bucks an ounce.

#16 42rocker

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 12:23 AM

FYI Gold was approx $35.00 from 1946 to 1967. Then in 1968 it rose to almost $40. Look where it has gone both up and down since then.
Glad it was the ruler and not your fingers.

Later 42rocker

#17 DonLans

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 02:13 PM

One of my rookie moves with a 6" scale was when I was cutting a shallow counterbore on the face of a 12" piece of stock. This was way before we had digitals. I was using my 6" scale instead of an inside caliper to get close to the 6.25" size I was roughing it out to. As soon as it got to 6", well, you can guess what happened.

#18 Sparky_NY

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 01:14 PM

This reminds me of a friend with a starret ruler, about 18" long I would guess. The ruler is OFF by about a quarter inch in length calibration. Very strange indeed, but we checked it very carefully and it indeed is way off in its calibration. Naturally, my friend noticed this after trusting it to make some parts. This is a real mystery! Maybe a factory reject that somehow made it out to the public? He still has it for conversation purposes, plus no one would believe it unless they seen it for themselves.

George

#19 42rocker

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 02:05 PM

Have a friend that has a large set of rulers that are "off". Ok, not really "off" he was a die maker and the rulers were made special that way to cover for shrinkage of the wood and other materials that he worked with. They look normal till you start to compare them next to each other. He has won a few bets with them.

Later 42rocker

#20 Cutter

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 04:40 PM

Tim,
Your description sounds more like a model maker , not a die maker.




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