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My big cannon barrel.


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#1 R-R

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 09:22 PM

Thought I'd post a picture of my big cannon barrel. All I have left to do is cut off every thing that doesn't look like a cannon... :lol:[attachment=0]DSC04444.JPG[/attachment]
P.S. A great place to get materal is a salvage yard. This is a piece of cylinder rod and I got it for .25 per Lb.

#2 jftool

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 09:31 PM

5# howitzer? isnt the cly. rod case hardened? are you making afireing cannon? have fun and good luck, john

#3 R-R

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 11:18 PM

jftool: In my experance of 20 years working in a Fourndry Machine and machining hunderds of cylinder rods, tubes, and end caps, I have yet to find any that were hard. More over, they need to be flexable to with stand constant working. Over the years they seem to be being made form softer and softer materal. That may be more and more flexable materal. Years back when cutting down a older cylinder rod , I would have to take a .300 deep cut on the first pass to get under the chorme and work hardened materal. From that point on it would cut like 4150. The chrome would chip and pop off as it cut. When we got new chromed rod materal I could take a .015 deep cut and you couldn't even tell, by the way it cut, that it was chromed. That being said, you might be right! I haven't even scratched this piece with a file. I may have bought a 125 Lb. paper weight. Ultimately I want know till I start scratching on it.... ;)

#4 jftool

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:10 PM

hi again, i had planned on making a mounton howizer, i got plans and never went any further, i recall they were calling for seamless tubing for the barrel a lot of welding, witch needed x- rays ect. i chickened out because i didnt want to blow myself up. regards john

#5 R-R

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 09:53 PM

Where did you get your plans and the cost..
I have pics of 1800s drawings but would have to scale it down. It has radiuses and bumps that complicate the job.. If you don't weld it up than you have to bore it out! My lathe is 13x30 & the bar is 27" long. It's going to be a real trick to drill/bore it out.
R-R
[attachment=0]sixpounder.jpg[/attachment]

#6 bruski

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:56 PM

:o Holy crap, a .300 cut. You must have some big equipment at work.

#7 jftool

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 12:13 PM

you can find the plans on line at 12 lb. mountain howizer, buckstick sells the plans for 80.00 which includes the carriage, that could be scaled down for the gatt. gun.

#8 shred

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 02:31 PM

There's plans for a scaled down 12 Lb Napoleon & carriage around as well. Comes out with about a 12" tube, less rings and flourishes than the Mountain howitzer. I suppose you could double those if you wanted. It was published in Home Shop Machinist a while back. I probably have a copy around here somewhere.

#9 R-R

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 12:39 AM

Bruski: We had a real old real heavy lathe 30" swing with a heavy 4 jaw chuck and it was real solid. That was .150 per side but still a heck of a cut and about the max it would cut. As a standard thing, We would machine 10" pipe molds (4150) and the lathe was only 6" long. We'd put the steady rest at the very end of the ways and the weight of the molds, 10' 8' long 11.5' dia. with a 2' or 3" or 4" hole through them, was enough that we took the top off the steady rest and set it on the floor. You just didn't need it. It would be OK for any kind of normal machining (.100 cut or so). We don,t anything like that heavy equiptment where I work now.

That was 30 years ago. AH.... The good old days. On another lathe that was larger and 22' long we'd put the same molds in and bore them out. They had to be tapered so we set the steady rest off center to get that taper. On a 1 1/2 hr long cut (3rd shift) you'd fall asleep and some times the mold would work it's way out of the chuck and BAM BAM BAM BOOM ! it would land on the ways... Oh! We had a couple of rail road ties setting accross the ways so it was OK but it would really wake you up! :shock:
jftool - shred Thanks I'll check out the plans you mentioned!
R-R

#10 bruski

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 04:49 AM

:lol: I bet you could share a lot of good old memories with us. Lucky you were on the 3rd shift when nobody was around to ask stupid questions about why there was so much noise coming from your area in the shop. :D bruski

#11 R-R

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 05:09 PM

That shop was diferent than most shops. Government work (employ projects) was a higher priority than company work some times. I once got chewed out for not building someone a power sander for his wood shop. That is not to say we didn't work hard. You had to work hard to get all the "company's work" done plus all the projects done too. I once machined a set of asphalt rippers for the back of the bosses bulldoser out of a old set of fork truck forks. A coworker build himself a power copeing saw (what ever you call it). Once the 2rd shift boss told me I could not go home till the mechanices got some piece of equiptment running. I had already been there 16hrs. He walked up and raked all the stuff off the work bench, unpluged the light, and said "I'll wake you up if we need anything". 8hrs later (@double time & a 1/2 that was Sunday morning) he woke me up and said "Go home were done." AAh the good old days. :) But then on the other hand, one year I got 1300 hrs overtime. That wairs real thin after a while! When the mantiance foreman got the end of year printout he hit the ceiling. "No more overtime!" One week later "12hrs a day till further notice" I was in the bathroom but I still heard him. But sence "I didn't hear him" :roll: I didn't do it. That lasted about a week and he came and told me personally :shock: 12Hrs A DAY. Of course we worked 8 or 12 or 16 every saturday and 8 every other Sunday. I don't want anymore overtime. :(
R-R

#12 R-R

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 01:32 AM

Chapter Two: The continuing story of my time in a machine shop…
Two weeks every year production in the foundry would shut down and the foundry employees would take vacation. During that time the maintenance department, of which the machine shop was a part, would overhaul major pieces of equipment. Everyone worked hard 16 hrs a day Monday through Saturday and 8 on Sunday if needed. At every area and at every machine we had a water line, compressed air line, and natural gas line for heat in the winter.
During one shutdown one employ (nick named “Preacher”) who was bad to play practical jokes on everyone had been working on some job and returned to his work area in the shop to find two guys looking under the tool cabinets in his area. As he approached they walked off talking to each other and still looking back under the tool cabinet. Preacher put down his tools and looked under the cabinets and turned to me, I was about 30 feet away, and said “come look at this great big rat. This foundry was right next to a major river so rats were no big surprise and since I was pretty tired I ignored him. I didn’t know it, but the two guys had found a big blob of DuctSeal which was made from putty like stuff with what looked like hair mixed in it. It was the perfect substance to make a real looking rat out of. Preacher thought a while and said “I’ll run him out of there with this broom. ;) He slammed that broom under the tool cabinet and ran it back and forth a few times. After he looked under there again he turned to me and said :? “That rat didn’t even move”. Again I ignored him. :roll: After thinking for a minute or two he said :twisted: “I’m goin to gas him out” and pulled the gas line off his heater (it was summer so it wasn’t on) and stuck it under the cabinet and let it run a while. And guess what! That rat didn’t even move a whisker… He said to himself “I’ll burn him out” and lit a piece of news paper and threw it under the cabinet.
WELL!...... there was a gigantic BOOM! The cabinet hit the 20ft ceiling and came crashing down throwing tools all over the place. The preacher was OK cause it blew him back out of the way and burned off his mustache, eye brows, and a lot of his hair. Otherwise he was OK. Ahhhhh the good old days….. :lol:

#13 R-R

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 03:41 AM

Chapter Three: Getting Even
I worked in that foundry for 15 years before I got to move to the machine shop. It was a very hot, dusty, noisy, dangerous place. Every dept. had it own phone and connected to each phone was a loud speaker they called a squawk box. You could hear a phone ring all the way across the foundry. While working in the foundry I worked for a foreman we’ll call C.O. He was the type of boss that would ride you as long as you would let him and would only back off after you had a nose to nose screaming, yelling fit with him. After that he’d back off for two or three weeks and then it would start all over again. He did a lot of the employees the same way, one of which was a guy nick named “Paddle Foot”. C.O. had a habit of sitting in a chair in the middle of his department and watching all the employees. When the plant manager would call he’d get up and walk over to the phone, answer it, and go back and sit down.
One day Paddle Foot decided to ring the phone in C.O.’s dept just to make him get up and answer it. Paddle Foot wouldn’t say anything but just hang up. He had been doing this three or four times a day for about a week when C.O. noticed that every time the phone would ring he’d see Paddle Foot looking at him, from across the foundry, laughing. The phone Paddle Foot used was not in direct line of sight with C.O.’s phone. So C.O. never actually saw Paddle Foot place a call. After Paddle Foot had been making him play jumping jacks for a while, C.O. went over to him and chewed him out for ringing the phone and hanging up and threatened to fire him if he was ever caught calling. Paddle Foot just laughed at him and denied it and took it as a challenge to continue. This went on for a couple of months but C.O. could never catch Paddle Foot making a call. At times C.O. would go to answer the phone and then run at full speed around a big row of equipment and try to catch Paddle Foot on the phone. What C.O. didn’t know was that I could and would see him coming and warn Paddle Foot to hang up and get busy doing something. C.O. never did caught Paddle Foot on the phone.. After C.O. enlisted another foreman to watch Paddle Foot, he finely got scared that he would be caught and stopped calling. SOOOOO, I took up the challenge. I worked in the middle of four machines. I could unplug some of the lights and it would be so dark that I could stand there and not be seen. I quickly decided to step up the assault. I wrote down the number of every phone that I could see from my position and C.O. could not walk by one anywhere in the plant without it ringing. Then I discovered conference calling. I would ring every phone in the entire plant, being careful not to do so when there was any other foreman in sight. Have you ever watched the opening scène in the move "The Omega Man" with Charlton Heston…… “THERE IS NO PHONE RINGING. DAMIT”
AHHHHHHH the good old days! :lol:

P.S. After reading this it does seem kind a mean! But it was a blast to do and he deserved it. :evil:

One last shot! When employees would retire someone would run a list and take up money for a going away gift. The list would contain people’s names and how much they gave.($5 or $10 ect.) When someone came around with a list for C.O. the sheet was about full of name so I used a large red marker to write my name 2 lines high and put "2 CENTS" beside it. I said "Make sure he gets it" :P Sometimes the good old days weren't so good.

#14 R-R

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:39 AM

Hi All: It's been a long time scence I've been on the board. I see that there haven't been any more posts on this thread. I guess I've scared everyone off with my storys. Well, there ture storys and they don't mention all the good people that worked there and the good friends I had there. I don't miss working in the foundry. OSHA would probably shut them down anyway if they were still runing. We were purchesed by Tyler Pipe Co. in Texas. It is said that they have the worst saftey record of any foundry in the U.S.
RR




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